Impact of Post-Harvest Training on Farmers in Lhuntse, Mongar, Trashigang and Trashiyangtse Dzongkhags

Impact of Post-Harvest Training on Farmers in Lhuntse, Mongar, Trashigang and Trashiyangtse Dzongkhags
  • Version
  • 2019Report Release Date
  • BhutanProject Country
  • Royal University of Bhutan, BhutanMDP Program
  • CARLEPProject Name
  • Yeshi SamdrupAuthor(s)
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Post-harvest training enhances capacity building of farmers and increases farmers’ income. It also helps in reducing post-harvest losses of vegetables. The post-harvest training was introduced by the Commercial Agriculture Resilience Livelihood Enhancement Program [CARLEP] in Wengkhar, under Mongar dzongkhag supported by the International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD). Post-harvest training have been carried out, however, no impact assessment has been done on effectiveness of post-harvest training on building the capacity of the farmers and income generation. Thus, this study was conducted to assess the impact of post-harvest training on building the capacity of the farmers on post-harvest management and consequently the income generation. This study was carried out in Lhuntse, Mongar, Trashigang, and Trashiyangtse Dzongkhags. Yamane formula was used to calculate the sample size (n=134). Data were collected using semi structured questionnaires through KoBoCollect toolbox application. T-test was used to analyze income earned before and after attending training. The results showed that most of the respondents (80%) have gained the knowledge and skills on postharvest management of vegetables and have practice it. About 70.1% responded that the best time for harvesting is either morning or evening during cooler part of the day. About 88.8% preferred room cooling because it minimizes decaying and loss and 50% preferred washing as the best cleaning method for leafy vegetables. About 70.9% of the respondents sorted the produce based on size for vegetables such as potatoes. Most of the farmers (67.9%) preferred sacks for packing large quantity for vegetables such as potatoes, cabbages, cauliflowers, broccolis, chilies, and radishes. Majority of the farmers (55.22%) transport their vegetables by motor vehicles. With the trainings they were able to manage the postharvest losses and similarly income earned differed significantly (p=<0.05) before training (Nu. 12,349.25) to (Nu. 25,595.90) after attending training.


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